Archive for June, 2008

Fresh Ways To Visualize News

Online news has gone through many changes since its early days as a mostly text-based enterprise. Video and multimedia presentations are now standard fare on many top sites. But there is still room to innovate in the presentation of stories, audience debates and other information. For large news companies and individual bloggers alike, coming up with new methods of presentation to keep people coming back and stay longer is an ongoing goal.

The Color Of Debate

White Spectrum is an interesting interface to view debate about “White Season,” a BBC’s television series that examines the white working class Britain. The Flash-based White Spectrum arranges the comments as dots in a outer space-like design. Comments are sorted and float towards certain emotions such as anger, fear, hurt, happiness or caring. For example, a comment with the word “abuse” in it floats towards the emotional dot for “hurt.” One can quickly recognize where the intense or angry debate is happening on this potentially explosive subject. (via Information Aesthetics)

Fun With Headlines

Our Signal

An intensely graphical display of news headlines comes from OurSignal, a mashup of social news sites Digg, Reddit, Delicious and Hacker News. The headlines are arranged in boxes, which are categorized by color and presented at different sizes based on popularity. The site’s form follows its functional design , allowing you to quickly zero in on news breaking across this part of the Web.

News As Games

News as Game

But who wants to read news, when you can play games? NewsBreaker is a RSS news reader disguised as a game of Pong. The site was designed by Fuel Industries, for MSNBC’s A Fuller Spectrum of News Campaign. It’s like a souped up game of Pong, except when you break blocks, headlines float down and are saved at the side of the game and can be read later. It’s an example of gaming (“funware“) spreading across the Web. Reading news can be fun. Who knew?

And Much More

This is just the beginning of innovation around news presentation and storytelling. For more interesting ways of visualizing the news, check out multimedia guru Mark Luckie’s take. He has examples of photo streams, live news cameras, map extravaganzas and other interesting designs and presentations.

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NowPublic: Don’t Call It Citizen Journalism

NowPublic is one of a group of crowd-sourcing media sites thave have cropped up in recent years. Newsvine, Current, CNN’s iReport and and South Korea-based OhMyNews are others that crowd-source links to news, or let authors write or shoot video of actual original articles. News giant Gannett also jumped in the fray in late 2006. Early on, NowPublic was noted for being one of the few sites to publish AP articles and allow people to discuss them. NowPublic however, doesn’t consider itself a “citizen journalism” service, its founder tells CNet. Instead it’s a brigade of “eyes and ears.”

Some of the others in this area are not shy about calling their services news. CNN’s iReport is taglined “Unfiltered. Unedited. News” and Current says, “You Make The News… We Put It On Television.”

Recently NowPublic released a number of new features, including a points-based ranking system to increase credibility for trusted users of the site; a FriendFeed-like news stream of people’s YouTube, Flickr and Twitter activity that can act as a kind of person’s personal news service; and a personal dashboard of news, photos and videos from whereever people want to receive news.

Coming at the same problem from the local-based approach are a number of local news and information aggregators.

Outside.In’s Maps Local News, Tweets

Start-up Outside.in recently launched Radar, a service that tells you what is being written online–from news sites, blogs etc.–about a particular geographic location. For example, it tells you what’s happening within 1000 feet of your location. It also collects “conversations” about a location, such as Twitters. The service also remembers what businesses or even neighborhoods in another city that you like, and updates you when things happen at those places. All this information is organized into a map-based interface.

Aggregating neighborhood data is an increasing area of interest. In January another site, Everyblock, launched a similar service that aggregates news, photos and government information, such as crime reports and restaurant health inspections. Everyblock, which has received a grant from the Knight Foundation, graphs all the data onto maps. Yourstreet, which maps news on down to the block level, is another similar service.

In addition to start-ups, giants such as Google and Yahoo are active in the local information space. Google recently release Map Maker, that allow people to create their own maps, and Yahoo has a service in India called Ourcity, and it has also licensed neighborhood information from Urban Mapping. How this will all translate into local advertising is key.

Twitter News Is Fast, But Not Always News

The news whipped around the Twittersphere, buoyed by the micro-blogging service’s ultra-viral speed: Jared Fogel, the famed Subway spokesman, was dead. That’s what eating all that Subway will do to you. Except that he wasn’t dead.

The rumor gained added legitimacy Wednesday morning from Kevin Rose, founder of Digg, who posted a Tweet pouring out some virtual liquor for Fogel. Rose has about 47,000 following his Twitter messages, which spread the news like wildfire.

Rose had taken the bait from Jaredremembered.com, a realistic-looking hoax site.

Twitter has been recognized for its ability to spread breaking news quickly. Recently news broke quickly on Twitter about the earthquake in China. Many journalists have signed on, at the very least to find out about breaking news. But like news sources on the Web at large, what you see is not always what you get.

“It wasn’t anything personal against Fogel,” the creator of the fake site said.

Outsourcing The News Business?

The OC Register announced it would outsource some copy-editing and layout work to India, the AP reported. The one-month test will include editing for the flagship newspaper as well as layout for a smaller community paper.

Mindworks Global Media, which does editing, “content creation” (writing) and design, will handle the work from offices outside New Delhi.

Other papers, such as the Miami Herald and the Sacramento Bee, have experimented with the outsourcing production and/or editing of editorial or advertising work to India.

Huffington Post Goes Local, Takes On Newspapers

The Huffington Post, the uber-blog that has taken on the top Web sites and news organizations, is going local. Arianna Huffington’s announcement that her company will be opening “dozens” of local sites across the country marks a potentially new front in the transformation of the news industry. Is this the beginning of a new type of national news chain, like Gannett or McClatchy, but completely online?

While details are scant at this point, Huffington said that the first local blog will be in Chicago. It will start off being run by one editor, but presumably will expand its staff from there.

The move into local news means more competition for local newspapers. Up until now, Huffington Post has not competed directly with local newspapers, instead focusing on national news, in particular political news. But with local news, Huffington Post could provide another source of competition for local newspapers. Most local blogs competing with local papers have been one-man-bands or other smaller scale operations–that have still broken news and drawn large traffic numbers. But Huffington Post, backed by significant resources and carrying a brand name, will present a new challenge.